Saturday, September 29, 2012

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

You are James T. Kirk (Captain)



http://www.seabreezecomputers.com/startrek
Click here to take the Star Trek Personality Quiz

Although, if this test was on looks I'd be Jean-Luc Picard. I do look ALOT like him!

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

2012 TMP Miniatures Exchange Matchup!

 
 
Thanks for participating in the Exchange!

Here are the rules again just as a reminder:

I would like for all mailings to be completed no later than September 18th. All attempts will be made to match you up with someone from your region, should you request as much in your sign up.

The rules: This exchange involves sending out a 5 man team/squad or vehicle of 15mm, painted (basing optional) scifi,future,post apocalyptic, or near future miniatures. You will get the same in return. This could be a coherent, uniform squad of any race, or it can be a mixed mercenary type of unit. the bare minimum is 5 average humanoid sized 15mm minis. if you want to include some oversize (think ogryns/super mutants) that is up to you.

This can be minis painted just for this exchange or a squad long ago finished and collecting dust, but either way try to make it something you are proud of. As well it could be stock miniatures,lightly to heavily converted, all the way to original sculpts(for the over achievers). a brief note to the recipient may be a nice touch if you are sending obscure stuff.

While there is no guarantee that you will receive something up to your painting standard, I think it will be a fun way to expand your forces , and possibly enlarge your horizons.

So, please send out by September 18th!

If you want to send you match, or me, and e-mail saying you shipped that would be appreciated too!

Here is your match:

Jeff Worley
 
I'll put up the painted troops when they get here!

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

A Public Service Announcement:

What’s the craic?” is a common Brit-on-Brit saying, but in “mixed” company it’s like, “What’s the what?” Here’s a look at Ten Baffling Words Said by Brits.

1. Craic = noun; news/what’s up, “What’s the craic?” This term originated in England (crack), moved to Northern Ireland (changed to Gaelic spelling craic) and then back to England retaining the Irish spelling. Got that? Either way, it’s pretty popular now and is a means to start up a conversation or inquire about news, gossip and anything that falls between.

2. Chuffed = adjective; pleased, “I’m chuffed!” In some uses chuffed means “being pleased with yourself.” Why not? If you’ve done a job well done, then why not stand proud? The original meaning of the term was “puffed with fat,” as in “having a big head.” However, if someone else is patting you on the back, they could say, “I’m chuffed for you.”

3. Knackered = adjective; tired, “I’m really knackered and need a kip (nap).” This word once meant “tired after sex,” but it’s evolved into just plain tired. So, no blushing is called for if hearing or using this word. If you say you’re tired, you might be sleepy. If you’re exhausted, you might be drained. Knackered gets the point across, you need a sit down.

4. Minging = adjective; foul or ugly, “I went camping and wore the same knickers for three days, they’re definitely minging.” This word has been popular in Scotland and England since the 1950s. Apparently it has just caught on in the past five years in other parts of the U.K. The second “g” is silent. It will definitely bring up a mental image, but just what image is that??

5. Pissed = adjective; drunk, “He’s pissed and should drink some water.” Even if you know the word pissed can mean drunk, it still might be confusing if someone says, “Are you pissed?” And you’re like, “No, I’m fine.” The person comes back at you saying, “You’re acting a little pissed.” It’s like, “Well, I’m a little agitated but I’m not mad or anything?” This word will be especially baffling if you are indeed “pissed” as in “intoxicated,” “Ah, you mean pissed!! Yes, I have been overserved.” Hiccup!

6. Pull = noun; the prowl or on the lookout for some lovin’, “I’m on the pull tonight.” Or, verb; “Did you pull last night?” This term came from Middle English pullen, turning the literal meaning “to pull” into slang meaning “pulling” someone home with you. If your friend says they’re on the pull it means they’re looking to get lucky.

7. Radge = noun; a crazy person: “He was starting trouble and acting like a radge.” Or, adjective; “That’s a radge t-shirt.” If a Brit turns to you and says, “You’re mad,” it’s probably nothing to lose sleep over. It most likely means, you’re ridiculously funny, and I like it. The word “mad” is thrown around left and right. But “radge” actually means mad, as in “insane,” leaning toward violent. Not a compliment.

8. Row = noun; argument, “I feel bad, we had a row when the bill came.” This isn’t pronounced row, as in “row a boat.” The word rhymes with wow and means “a conflict or argument with another person.” Usually it’s not too heavy and both parties involved can just let it go or assume you will make up soon if it’s necessary to clear the air.

9. Treacle = noun; sugar/sweetheart, “How’s tricks treacle?” “Treacle” is usually a term of endearment for a good looking woman but it depends on who it’s coming from. If your lad says it and gives you a squeeze, it’s a nice thing. If it’s said to you on the street, it’s not necessarily endearing, i.e. “‘Ello treacle! Oy, too good for us duchess?”

10. Waffle = verb; ramble, “Stop waffling about and get to the point.” In this scenario, basically you are talking unendingly. If someone says you’re waffling then it might be best to get back on track with your story.

Thought Of The Day


Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Latest Ebay Haul




10 Leopards, 5 M980 , 8 Sheridan M55, 6 Marder, 5 jeeps, 9 TPZ1

1 Jadgpanzer, 

Sunday, September 9, 2012

Company Mods Stargrunt II



mods for Stargrunt Stuart Murray proposed: I've pasted it below:

SGII - Company Mods
It became apparent to my gaming group that the typical platoon-level SG game was over too quickly if one side lost a single squad from arty or aerospace attack. We kind of stopped using these in games so games lasted a little longer. I started thinking about this more and I realized that what I wanted to play was a reinforced company level combined arms game in which a small amour contingent could effectively support a single company (including organic mortars/HMGs) and not skew the game too much with its firepower.

One problem with using larger forces is the alternating action phase. Because opponents can react to the actions of a single squad operational coherency quickly dissolved. It seemed wrong to me that a company commander could not gain an advantage by activating a whole platoon rather than a single squad.

Another disadvantage of playing larger SG games is the time it takes to move lots of individual figures. While playing I observed that players tend to worry greatly about the facing and disposition of individual troops. I noted that in larger games this focus on the individual troops tended to distract the commanders from the 'larger picture' of the tactical battle.

I began tinkering with how I could activate whole platoons in a timely manner while lifting the tactical level from squad combat to platoon/company combat.

To speed moving figures and relieve the player of worrying about individuals I started to gang base squads. I found that too much detail was lost when basing squads so I dropped the multi-basing to the level of fire teams. I tried it a few times and it seemed to work out. I then tried lifting the tactical level by activating platoons/or platoon equivalents (such as a pair of tanks) with a single chit, like Dirtside.

I tried it a couple of times on gaming buddies before bringing it to the GZG ECC. The feedback from them was positive. There is very little 'learning curve' and the leaner game appealed more than regular SG to a player who was new to SG (he had only played a couple of times).
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Stuart sent me an email recently about what he calls his SGII Company Mods. I personally find it fascinating. I remember my disappointment in reading a discussion on the Yahoo 15mm SciFi group a few months ago where people were saying that you couldn't really play SG with more than 50 figs per size. I read the DS rules and thought that there had to be a way to come up with a compromise between the two. At GZG ECC IX I walked up to "Contact, Wait, Out" and Stuart was running the game I imagined, only it looked better! Grant walked up and made the observation that the game looked very fluid, the attacker had made it across the entire battlefield during the 3-4 hour game.



So here's what Stuart had to say. I'd be interested in any comments. I'm going to try this out, although I think I'll get some 30mm bases instead of 1" because my figures are larger than Stuart's (his are Peter Pig 15's). Also, I don't think I'll permanently base my figures. Since my 15's are on steel washers I'll add a magnet to a Litko 30mm base and create a "movement tray". It'll give me more flexibility as I work all of this out.

Stuart Murray
SGII - Company Mods
(This does not relate to Cinegrunt, that's an entirely different beast*)

It became apparent to my gaming group that the typical platoon-level SG game was over too quickly if one side lost a single squad from arty or aerospace attack.  We kind of stopped using these in games so games lasted a little longer.  I started thinking about this more and I realized that what I wanted to play was a reinforced company level combined arms game in which a small amour contingent could effectively support a single company (including organic mortars/HMGs) and not skew the game too much with its firepower.

One problem with using larger forces is the alternating action phase.  Because opponents can react to the actions of a single squad operational coherency quickly dissolved.  It seemed wrong to me that a company commander could not gain an advantage by activating a whole platoon rather than a single squad.

Another disadvantage of playing larger SG games is the time it takes to move lots of individual figures.  While playing I observed that players tend to worry greatly about the facing and disposition of individual troops.  I noted that in larger games this focus on the individual troops tended to distract the
 commanders from the
 'larger picture' of the tactical battle.

I began tinkering with how I could activate whole platoons in a timely manner while lifting the tactical level from squad combat to platoon/company combat.

To speed moving figures and relieve the player of worrying about individuals I started to gang base squads. I found that too much detail was lost when basing squads so I dropped the multi-basing to the level of fire teams. I tried it a few times and it seemed to work out. I then tried lifting the tactical level by activating platoons/or platoon equivalents (such as a pair of tanks) with a single chit, like Dirtside.
I tried it a couple of times on gaming buddies before bringing it to the GZG ECC.  The feedback from them was positive.  There is very little 'learning curve' and the leaner game appealed more than regular SG to a player who was new to SG (he had only played a couple of times).

So, what I ended up with is a way to play faster, more complex, games of SG in an evening and I still get to use all my little toys*

Mods for company gaming: (NB, I use 15mm figs)
I've nothing written down, its all in my head so here goes...
Basing
Fire teams, or functional groups (such as command, SAM, ATGW etc) are based on a single base. I use a 1" base, usually square. This represents the team within a 10mx10m area (SG scale is stated as 1"=10m)
Fire teams are two (high tech and PA), to four figures (low tech) per base. Specialists are usually 2-3 figures.
Example Platoon * Commonwealth Infantry Platoon
Command: Base of Lt., Sgt, RTO
3x Rifle Sections: Base of NCO and 1 rifleman, 2x (Base of 2 riflemen and 1 SAW)
Support: Base of Marksman and 1 rifleman, Base of ATGW (2 figures)
Platoon rides in 4x IFVs
Company Command
Only company command has EW and artillery support chits. Platoons do not, this helps preserve the chain of command for such request/priorities.
Activation
A single platoon group (or equivalent) is activated at a time. When activated all bases/elements in the group may perform independent actions, i.e. in an infantry platoon some may fire while others move (An example of cover fire and move, otherwise not modeled well in SG). All SG rules apply, such as leader replacement etc (in this case it will be a base that is promoted).
Movement
I typically choose a base near the center of the platoon, measure and move that base, then move all the other bases without measuring. Firing
Firepower is calculated per figure in a fire team, as SG. NB, the PLATOON is firing, so, it is up the player how they resolve fire team firing. Pick targets and detail how many fire teams are firing at each target.
Example, a Commonwealth Infantry platoon firing on a Union infantry group. The Commonwealth player chooses to target the Union group with three sections (three groups of three fire teams). First determine the firepower for each section; resolve as SG for each section independently.
GMS: Any figure with a GMS may fire with either the GMS, or with a rifle/SMG etc. I do not limit the GMS to 3/4 shots; the fire team will carry reloads.
Mixed bases: bases with riflemen and a SAW gunner may fire either combined i.e. SAW in support, or just as a SAW.
Casualties
Each base can take TWO wounds; this is independent of the number of figures actually on a base. If a base gets one hit I place an untreated casualty marker next to, or on, the base. If the casualty gets treated I replace that with a treated casualty marker (I use regular casualties for untreated and figs on stretchers for treated). I use casualty marker castings from Peter Pig. If a base gets two hits it is dead and I replace it with two untreated casualty markers. (I adopted an idea from a historical gamer, he used two sets of generic markers, one green, one grey, that way he did not have to buy specific casualties, he used the same ones for everything. It sounds strange, but I find it is effective)
Any casualty (treated or not) is moved with the fire team. Casualties can be 'pooled' for protection, left at an aide point, or recovered by medevac; if so I use a small marker (a small piece of pipe cleaner placed on the base) to represent the base having one 'hit'. Alternatively, casualties can be abandoned like regular SG and the base marked accordingly.
If I've forgotten anything I'll try to add later.

A few comments on 'Moving Things Along Quickly'

One thing I try to do ay the GZG ECC is move games along, if people feel that I'm being too pushy, I'm sorry.  That is not the intention.

In Cinegrunt games I try to steer the game toward a suitably cinematic climax.  The casualty in this is usually the SG rules.  I tend to play them very loosely, perhaps players have already noticed this =8-).  I feel that player involvement and a fun plot is more important than the rules.

I tend not to run many 'normal' SG games. When I do I'm pushy for a different reason. I'm trying to create something of the tactical decision making atmosphere of the battlefield in the game.
In combat a platoon commander has to make quick decisions, they may not always be the right ones, but his men are depending upon him to make decisions.  If a commander is slow and indecisive he may miss key opportunities to turn the battle.  If this wasn't enough, junior commanders are always under pressure from their higher command.

So, when I press players to 'use it or lose it' I'm encouraging them to try to take timely actions/turns and not spend too much time agonizing over strategies, that's the job of the higher-ups !

In my defense, I do try to balance this pressing. I only push players who I think will respond positively and I also try to teach/coach during a game. I don't want players to feel I pushed them into a strategy that they did not want. I try to help them out with tips and pointers, either how kit or rules work, or with tactical perspectives of how their advance looks from the other end of the table (Its remarkable how few players actually walk round and look at the game from the other end of the table; me included when I'm gaming!).
My goal is to try to show players an alternative style of SG game, it may not always suit their style but I try to help make it a fun game.  Finally, I'm no ogre; if you do play in one of my games and you feel I'm pushing unreasonably please let me know.  It's a game; it should be fun for you too.

Specifically regarding the 'Contact, Wait, Out' game. I've seen a few games like it at historical events and one real problem with 'deployment' games like this is the game stalling while the attackers spend large amounts of time worrying about getting their toys on the table. I tried to prevent this from happening and keep a certain dynamic tension during the game. Tom and Steve were under pressure to deploy and attack while being simultaneously hit by air attack and arty fire. I think they did a great job of it. They conducted a decisive and effective assault down the table.
Damon and Joel did a good job of stalling the attack; they fought doggedly to the last, they held the advance right to the edge of the table. If their reinforcement rolls had been different by one turn perhaps the game may have turned out in their favour.
I think both sides played a good game and they appeared to enjoy it too, a bonus!
Stuart.


So, what I ended up with is a way to play faster, more complex, games of SG in an evening and I still get to use all my little toys*

Mods for company gaming: (NB, I use 15mm figs)

Basing
Fire teams, or functional groups (such as command, SAM, ATGW etc) are based on a single base. I use a 1" base, usually square. This represents the team within a 10mx10m area (SG scale is stated as 1"=10m)

Fire teams are two (high tech and PA), to four figures (low tech) per base. Specialists are usually 2-3 figures.
Example Platoon: Commonwealth Infantry Platoon

Command: Base of Lt., Sgt, RTO
3x Rifle Sections: Base of NCO and 1 rifleman, 2x (Base of 2 riflemen and 1 SAW)
Support: Base of Marksman and 1 rifleman, Base of ATGW (2 figures) Platoon rides in 4x IFVs

Company Command
Only company command has EW and artillery support chits. Platoons do not, this helps preserve the chain of command for such request/priorities.

Activation
A single platoon group (or equivalent) is activated at a time. When activated all bases/elements in the group may perform independent actions, i.e. in an infantry platoon some may fire while others move (An example of cover fire and move, otherwise not modeled well in SG). All SG rules apply, such as leader replacement etc (in this case it will be a base that is promoted).

Movement
I typically choose a base near the center of the platoon, measure and move that base, then move all the other bases without measuring.

Firing
Firepower is calculated per figure in a fire team, as SG. NB, the PLATOON is firing, so, it is up the player how they resolve fire team firing. Pick targets and detail how many fire teams are firing at each target. Example: a Commonwealth Infantry platoon firing on a Union infantry group. The Commonwealth player chooses to target the Union group with three sections (three groups of three fire teams). First determine the firepower for each section; resolve as SG for each section independently.

GMS: Any figure with a GMS may fire with either the GMS, or with a rifle/SMG etc. I do not limit the GMS to 3/4 shots; the fire team will carry reloads.
Mixed bases: bases with riflemen and a SAW gunner may fire either combined i.e. SAW in support, or just as a SAW.
Casualties

Each base can take TWO wounds; this is independent of the number of figures actually on a base. If a base gets one hit I place an untreated casualty marker next to, or on, the base. If the casualty gets treated I replace that with a treated casualty marker (I use regular casualties for untreated and figs on stretchers for treated). I use casualty marker castings from Peter Pig. If a base gets two hits it is dead and I replace it with two untreated casualty markers. (I adopted an idea from a historical gamer, he used two sets of generic markers, one green, one grey, that way he did not have to buy specific casualties, he used the same ones for everything. It sounds strange, but I find it is effective)
Any casualty (treated or not) is moved with the fire team. Casualties can be 'pooled' for protection, left at an aid point, or recovered by medevac; if so I use a small marker (a small piece of pipe cleaner placed on the base) to represent the base having one 'hit'. Alternatively, casualties can be abandoned like regular SG and the base marked accordingly.

Friday, September 7, 2012

From The Armchair General






To show that the madness is in no way constrained by ebay: I got the following from my buddy
The Armchair General

http://armchairgeneral1.blogspot.com/

Frist Group:
Lot 1 - 20mm Jihad by Stan Johansen
5 bags of unopened miniatures
18 lose figures.
These are all insurgents

Lot2 - 20mm Cold War
3 bags of USA
4 bags of Africa
6 bags Russian
6 bags of Mercs
Second Group:
Lot 02 - 15mm Various

These are a mixture of 15mm diecast and plastic kits.
 
Lot 03 - 15mm Zombies
This lot contains four AFVs and a bunch of unopened Rebel Minis!
Everything you need to play ATZ, Ambush Z or Mortiston USA!
They include Soldiers, Civilians, Zombies, Cultists, Vampires, Mummies and Aliens!